Mathematics Research Guide: Podcasts in Mathematics

| | 0 Comments

First off, why are you assuming that because someone is a mathematician, they have “stuff they like to do in general”? The friends I have in Math couldn’t really be more different. They’re as diverse as any other set of graduate students, in my experience. I guess my best advice would be too treat us like human beings instead of some kind of monolithic hive mind, I. Treat us like we have individuality and don’t have “stuff we like to do in general”. Get to know us, basically. We are the Math. We will add your biological and intellectual distinctiveness to our own.

How maths can help you with dating, queuing and making good life decisions

The internet has made many things easier, including dating, allowing us to interact and connect with a plethora of new people—even those that were deemed unreachable just fifteen minutes beforehand. Christian Rudder, one of the founders of OKCupid, examines how an algorithm can be used to link two people and to examine their compatibility based on a series of questions. As they answer more questions with similar answers, their compatibility increases.

Applying the Optimal Stopping Theory to love, dating, and marriage: Once you’re 37 percent of the way through something, committing to the.

Mathematician Bobby Seagull has tried to use numbers to solve his romantic difficulties. Is he on to something? They say love is a numbers game. Bobby Seagull — the mathematician who rose to fame as a finalist on University Challenge in — took them literally. A few years ago, he sat down to try to work out why he had been so unlucky in life. From the total female populations of London and Cambridge — the cities between which he split his time — Seagull selected those roughly his age and up to 10 years younger.

Then he reduced that group to the proportion that were likely to be university educated, to reflect the reality of his networks, as a school maths teacher and doctorate student. Then came a harder parameter: what fraction Seagull might find attractive. That left Seagull with 29, potential girlfriends: as he puts it, a decent-sized crowd at the old West Ham ground at Upton Park.

This mathematical theory explains how women can be more successful on dating sites

Mathematics Research Guide: Podcasts in Mathematics. Recommended Math Podcasts Mathematical Moments from the AMS The American Mathematical Society Mathematical Moments program promotes appreciation and understanding of the role mathematics plays in science, nature, technology, and human culture. My Favorite Theorem A podcast dedicated to sharing our guests’ favorite mathematical results.

Follow us on Twitter at myfavethm. A Brief History of Mathematics Professor of Mathematics Marcus du Sautoy reveals the personalities behind the calculations and argues that mathematics is the driving force behind modern science. Inspired by the fact that women are vast minority in higher mathematics, Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist serves to increase enrollment and participation of women in mathematics and STEM courses.

that India has quite an impressive mathematical heritage dating back to Vedic times and that a book entitled Vedic Mathematics exists. Any.

For first-years at Duke, stress comes in various forms: making friends, struggling in class, missing the bus. For many of these novel pressures, Duke attempts to provide some feeble remediation. But for perhaps the most stressful of all—finding love—even Duke can provide no help. From first-year move-in to commencement, you have around 1, days to find the best possible person to start your Duke romance with.

But finding love, especially mathematically optimal love, is no small feat. Settle down too early, and end up missing out on an even better future partner. Wait too long, and all your best suitors may already be taken. You may try your luck at Shooters—but rarely can one find oneself among the sweat and iniquity there, let alone their one true love. You can achieve the greatest verifiable odds of finding your perfect match—all you have to do is follow dating advice from a mathematician.

The 37 percent rule it generated has been found everywhere from fish mating behavior to choosing optimal toilets at music festivals. And now the power of optimal stopping theory is going to help you find the perfect partner at Duke.

OKCupid: The Math Behind Online Dating

Feelings are relative and not always accurate. And the only thing certain about dating is uncertainty. I promise, there are no graphs or equations — just some pretty helpful theories from those who have approached dating in ways most of us have never thought to. Data enthusiast and future thinker Amy Webb gave a TED talk about how she used mathematics to hack online dating.

In a world of some nine billion or so people, how can you know when the nice guy or gal you’re currently dating is the best you’re going to find?

Chris McKinlay was folded into a cramped fifth-floor cubicle in UCLA’s math sciences building, lit by a single bulb and the glow from his monitor. The subject: large-scale data processing and parallel numerical methods. While the computer chugged, he clicked open a second window to check his OkCupid inbox. McKinlay, a lanky year-old with tousled hair, was one of about 40 million Americans looking for romance through websites like Match. He’d sent dozens of cutesy introductory messages to women touted as potential matches by OkCupid’s algorithms.

Most were ignored; he’d gone on a total of six first dates. On that early morning in June , his compiler crunching out machine code in one window, his forlorn dating profile sitting idle in the other, it dawned on him that he was doing it wrong. He’d been approaching online matchmaking like any other user.

Genius way actuary used maths to score girlfriend on dating app

Okay, go on. This led me on a rabbit hunt through the internet to understand where that number the 37 percent came from. This is also where the concept of e started to go a little over my head and I stopped Googling.

Penner Women who believe the man should be the one to make the first move might want to rethink their dating strategy — especially online.

Although it seems as if mobile applications for online dating are mostly about connecting new people, the mathematics used behind the scenes is intriguing. What do we know about the algorithms used for these apps and what does the app know about us? And, more importantly, how is our online dating life influenced by this information? With the availability of online dating applications, it is getting more and more easy to meet and date new people.

For example, using Tinder, you can see the profiles of people around you. Based on their pictures and biography, you can choose to either swipe them right or left. It seems as if all people in and around your neighbourhood show up in your feed, in a somewhat random order. However, this is not at all as random as one might think.

Behind the quite simple concept of the app Tinder, there is a much more sophisticated algorithm determining which people will and will not be shown as a potential match for you. The details behind these algorithms are, unfortunately, kept secret. Luckily, some manners are published about the way Tinder determines your potential matches. For example, we know that a so called ELO-score is used. The ELO-score depends on the kind of profiles you like, or swipe right, and on the kind of profiles you like.

For instance, if someone with a much higher ELO-score likes you, this has a positive effect on your personal score.

First-years: Don’t fall in love, according to math

We want to make things that you love Tweet Share on Facebook. Pilot prisonstudy 18th February 10, Podcast Dating. Close pilot.

on an internet dating website. These patterns twist and turn and warp and evolve just as love does, and are all patterns which mathematics is.

If you studied algebra in high school or you’re learning it right now , there’s a good chance you’re familiar with the quadratic formula. If not, it’s possible you repressed it. By this point, billions of us have had to learn, memorise, and implement this unwieldy algorithm in order to solve quadratic equations, but according to mathematician Po-Shen Loh from Carnegie Mellon University, there’s actually been an easier and better way all along, although it’s remained almost entirely hidden for thousands of years.

In a new research paper , Loh celebrates the quadratic formula as a “remarkable triumph of early mathematicians” dating back to the beginnings of the Old Babylonian Period around BCE, but also freely acknowledges some of its ancient shortcomings. That arduous task — performed by approximately four millennia worth of maths students, no less — may not have been entirely necessary, as it happens.

Of course, there have always been alternatives to the quadratic formula , such as factoring, completing the square, or even breaking out the graph paper. But the quadratic formula is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and reliable method for solving quadratic problems, even if it is a bit inscrutable. This is what it looks like:. In September, Loh was brainstorming the mathematics behind quadratic equations when he struck upon a new, simplified way of deriving the same formula — an alternative method which he describes in his paper as a “computationally-efficient, natural, and easy-to-remember algorithm for solving general quadratic equations”.

He uses an averaging technique that concentrates on the sum, as opposed to the more commonly taught way of focusing on the product of two numbers that make up c, which requires guesswork to solve problems.

A Discrete Mathematicians Guide to Dating


Hi! Do you need to find a sex partner? It is easy! Click here, registration is free!